Definition Parsing

A short blurb about the definition parsing features coming in the next version of pgEdit. There are two new commands so far, with lots more added to the wish list. I have been using these features regularly for the past few weeks and find they save me a great deal of time. I hope to make them available in a beta version sometime in the next few weeks.

  • Find Definition - Finds the definition source by name (with completion) in any open file. Jumps directly to the definition without prompting if the highlighted text matches the name of a definition.
  • List Buffer Definitions - List all of the definitions in the file with an icon corresponding to the definition type. Full keyboard control for type-ahead selection, jump to definition (Return), or cancel (Escape).

Here is a screenshot for Macintosh and one for Windows.

PostgreSQL Plugin for 4D

Pluggers Software has produced a very nice PostgreSQL plugin for 4th Dimension. It is based on libpq, so you'll find all the typical features you expect in a PostgreSQL client library including prepared statements, LISTEN/NOTIFY handling, and data type conversion. The library also includes handy row set management routines with calls similar to those used in 4D selection handling.

After evaluating the demo version for several days, I sent in my order along with some suggested improvements for handling NULL values in 4D. Shortly after my license arrived, I received a second email with a new version of the plugin attached. It included the features I had just requested.

SSH Tunneling

If you have PostgreSQL databases hosted remotely, SSH tunneling provides a convenient and secure communications mechanism. This approach avoids issues with SSL certificate configuration and obviates the need to modify the pg_hba.conf file to setup host permissions. The primary disadvantage is that some hosting providers do not allow SSH access (or only provide it on more expensive accounts).

Here is an example to setup SSH tunneling for PostgreSQL:

ssh -L 5555:localhost:5432 -l remoteuser myhost.com

This forwards connections made on localhost port 5555 to myhost.com port 5432. The -l parameter is your user name for shell access on the remote system (not your PostgreSQL user name).

So to use pgEdit, pgAdmin, or any other PostgreSQL utility, use localhost and port 5555 along with the same login credentials you would normally provide to connect to the database.

Resources:

PostgreSQL Powered


It has been a somewhat embarrassing secret. Until this weekend, pgedit.com was using MySQL for the content management system back end database. I intended to use PostgreSQL from the start, but the hosting provider only offered an old version (7.3) and there was a lack of necessary tools to run it properly. MySQL had an automatic installer that set everything up with a few mouse clicks.

Happily, pgedit.com is now running the latest version of Drupal and PostgreSQL 8. In addition to being a very nice content management system, Drupal provides a flexible framework for developing web database applications. There was a recent thread about this on the pgsql-general mailing list. Kevin Murphy pointed out the existence of some MySQL bias in the Drupal contributed modules and suggests the idea of a pool of Drupal/PostgreSQL testers to remedy the situation.

pgEdit 1.1 released

pgedit.com is pleased to announce the release of pgEdit 1.1, a powerful tool for PostgreSQL database development and administration. Changes since the release of version 1.0 include:

  • Many user interface improvements including toolbars for both the Macintosh and Windows versions. The editor and output panes are now available in the same view.
  • PHP can act as a preprocessor for SQL code or perform other scripting tasks. Mixed syntax coloring of PHP and SQL in the same file is supported including syntax coloring for pl/PHP stored procedures. PHP 5 is included with the distribution, so no extra configuration is required to use PHP features.
  • New options are available for execution and output. Output can be sent to a file and then opened automatically with pgEdit, your web browser, or other applications.
  • Error information is collected with each execution. New commands are available to jump to each error location in the file even if lines are added or removed.
  • Improved integration with psql, the PostgreSQL interactive terminal. Most psql commands are now supported including \connect and \copy.
  • Compatibility with Mac OS X 10.4 (Tiger). pgEdit 1.1 is available for Mac OS X 10.3 or later and Windows 2000/XP.

See the product information page for a complete list of pgEdit features.

pgEdit 1.1b3 - Mac OS X 10.4 compatible

pgEdit 1.1b3 is now available for download. This version is now compatible with Mac OS X 10.4 (Tiger). pgEdit 1.1b3 also includes several interface improvements including toolbars for both the Macintosh and Windows versions. A summary of new pgEdit 1.1 features is available here.

pgEdit 1.1 beta is free of all demonstration limitations through June 6, 2005.

See the download page for software and system requirements.

pgEdit 1.1b2

The second beta version of pgEdit 1.1 is now available. This version adds some enhancements to PHP syntax coloring and includes a few minor bug fixes. See the release notes included in the distribution for complete details. A summary of new pgEdit 1.1 features is available here.

pgEdit 1.1 beta is free of all demonstration limitations through the end of May.

See the download page for software and system requirements.

pgEdit 1.1 beta

The first beta of pgEdit 1.1 is now available. New features and enhancements include:

  • Error information is collected with each execution. New commands to jump to each error location in the file even if lines are added or removed.
  • Improved integration with psql; most psql commands are now supported including \connect and \copy.
  • PHP integration. PHP can act as a preprocessor for SQL code or perform other scripting tasks. Mixed syntax coloring of PHP and SQL in the same file is supported including syntax coloring for pl/PHP stored procedures. PHP 5 is included with the distribution, so no extra configuration is required to use this feature. See PHP example.
  • Faster and better syntax coloring. stdin data for COPY is ignored for coloring (unless followed a PHP tag).
  • New options for execution and output. Output can be sent to a file and then opened automatically with pgEdit, your web browser, or other applications.
  • Improved user interface with the editor and output panes available in the same view.

pgEdit 1.1 beta is free of all demonstration limitations through the end of May.

PHP support

A preview of coming attractions in pgEdit 1.1: PHP support. PHP can be used in two different ways. First, it can be used to write plPHP stored procedures. In this case pgEdit looks for a $php$ dollar quote or the LANGUAGE parameter with 'plPHP' at the start of the function definition. If this is found, PHP syntax coloring is used for the body of the function.

PHP can also be used as a preprocessor to parameterize and dynamically generate SQL. pgEdit recognizes opening and closing PHP tags and automatically switches syntax coloring between PHP and SQL. The PHP output from the mixed syntax file is then passed to psql for processing.

New mailing lists added

Two new mailing lists have been added for pgedit.com. The news mailing list is a low volume list for news and product announcements. The pgEdit list is a general support and discussion list for pgEdit.

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